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20121201
20121231
SHOW
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KQED (PBS) 16
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
WETA 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, w
affordable. if you think that bob krathit earns 15 schillings a week even someone as poor as him could afford to buy it in monthly parts. dickens knew how to manipulate an audience of one or an audience of 3,000 or 4,000 people. there were reports of people fainting at readings of the murder of nancy by sykes, people swooning at the parts of his readings. i mean that might have been just been the conditions in these venues where 3,000-4,000 people were gathered together to listen to him. but he certainly knew how to manipulate the emotions of a live audience. he was a consummate actor. dickens' relationship to the u.s. was very much a love/hate relationship, love before he came here quickly turning to hate after about three months. he came full of high ideals. he had been reading about america for a long time and looked upon america as a place that had thrown off all of the old problems of europe and britain. you know, the social system and those kinds of things that dickens felt really got in the way of business. when he got here, he was idolized straight off the ship. he was invited out to
with the helicopter and bob gates said to me boy when he saw that. because he was down at the heart of it and he remembered that. he says, you know, is this -- >> he had actually part of why he was in favor of the bomb as opposed to the helicopter raid. he was afraid of that. >> rose: here's the professionalism again. they said mission continues. there was not a moment that they didn't say. they may have considered it but they were so professional and so well trained that they knew the mission was still open to success. >> well it hadn't been, it was a hard landing, so there were no casualties, and i think the guys got shook up pretty good. but ... like you said, they do assaults every night. >> rose: the two of you when you were making this movie look at each other and say we're making a movie about one of the great stories of our time. >> i don't think we'll get another one this good. >> kind of the story of a lifetime. >> the whole time. >> rose: this is the story of a lifetime and we've been given this opportunity because we were prepared to do it and we had the right combination of skill
piece bob simon did for 60 minutes showing you conducting a youth orchestra in la. >> uh-huh. >> rose: during a practice. here it is. >> on saturdays all the kids get together in an orchestra. today we were there, so was gustavo, who has been conducting youth orchestras back in venezuela since he was 13 and has his own way to get musicians to understand the music. >> what do you want to play first? >> ah, okay. one, and -- no, no, no, tempo, together. la, la, la. la, la, la. it is like a man talking to a girl, you know. la, la, la re fa. >> do re mi. >> maybe. okay. none of these kids knew anything about classical music before they came here. but gustavo knows that the program does a lot more than teach music, it builds character, discipline and teamwork. and he keeps kids off the streets. >> it is how we started, i remember this overture, would play, you know, i play as a child, and it is amazing, because to see the transformation of these children, not because of the rehearsal, it is because the power of music, how it can change the life, and what you cannot see there is the paren
of defense. bill gates, a very good secretary of defense, -- bob gates said to me you need quickly to cultivate and devote time to relationships because you realize you're in this together. >> completely agree. and i would say if anything the pendulum is coming back hardener that direction. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning coming out of the crisis. i think there's less trust in general. >> rose: it's part of the job in washington. so you value relationship very much and so there are hundreds of c.e.o.s that i know who i can pick up the phone and they trust g.e. and they trust g.e. because they know me or my team and i think that's immensely valuable and i think in the end it's important that business leaders and politicians have a better sense of trust than maybe what we've had over the last five years and, again, those things never work unless you assume you're 50% of the problem. that's what you've got to -- >> rose: assume you're 50% of the problem? in other words -- >> i'm not blameless. >> there's two kinds of advice you can give. this is what i try to do. one is here's what
, people, old people my age who are still out working hard to earn some money, bob dillon is still out there. >> rose: he had an art exhibit this year in new york. >> yes? >> rose: yes. but he is out there singing you are right, he is on the road. >> well he is not exactly singing. he is sort of shouting. but -- but he still gets up there on the stage and -- >> rose: is this a critique? >> no. >> rose: just observing? >> i am trying to be descriptive. that's all. >> rose: so who are the musicians you most admire? of your family? >> i just like people -- >> rose: like pete seeinger. >> pete seeger is amazing. he is what, 92, i think and he is still -- he is still very much himself. he is a great man. no. i like people who -- whose voices i can join and i slide in and sing bass or i can sting alto but i would rather sing bass so i would rather sing with women and you get two women and 35 is a man who can sing tenor and we make a quartet that is the most beautiful thing. i don't care if i ever make another cd but i love singing in a quartet. >> rose: if you gave all of this up either inv
to the families who don't know the details of how their husbands or sons died. but actually i talked about bob woodward about it and he was very helpful in mentoring, and he said, you need to ten the, tell the truth so i did. >> rose: tell what you know? >> i held back a little bit. >> rose: what kinds of things would you hold back? >> a brain being pulp, i didn't think i needed to use that word from bullets, pulpify. >> something to the ribs. >> rose: what can happen to the ribs. >> rose: we saw some of that with steven spielberg when we saw the movie about d-day that was the thing about the movie that made it different from other movies. >> i remember. >> rose: limbs being ripped off and that kind of thing. >> when i saw private, staving private ryan i needed a drink just seeing the movie and it was hollywood so this is real but i felt like ultimately i had to be honest, there were other things that were difficult decisions to make, one of them was, one of the soldiers who dies in the book and the back trace it is whole history of the outpost from 2006 to 2009, one of the, one of the soldier
the shot. and bob richardson lights the shot for that frame. and that's it. and i don't want sloppy-ass crap, you know, in there that i can just cut to. if any composition you see in my movie was composed by me, and that's what he meant to do. >> rose: i've seen a movie of yours can was composed by you. "comb pose it" means? >> means to set the frame. >> rose: just to set frame. that means to compose it. how close it is, where-- >> exactly. balance the frame, make it right. >> rose: some might suggest-- and this is the a question-- if you could have been leodardo dicaprio and have his acting career, would you prefer that than the director of directing crier of quentin tarantino? >> me way. >> rose: you know that people don't believe you. they believe you really want to be an actor. >> dia long time ago. trust me, it i've lost that bug so much i can't even tell you. i can't even tell you how much i lost that bug. i had the bug. i got bit. it's gone. it's gone. >> rose: you got bit after you made your first film? >> no, i always wanted to be an actor early or and everything, but i got
money. what financial advisors are saying about gold, and a conversation with b.e.t.'s bob johnson. all that, and more, on this edition of "the truth about money."
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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